Low Intensity Laser Therapy (LILT)

Laser MachineLILT is a form of laser medicine used in physical therapy that uses low-level (low-power) lasers or light emitting diodes to alter cellular function. Low-power laser stimulates and encourages cells to function and enhances the body’s immune system response as well as facilitating natural healing.
A laser is a device that emits light through a process of optical amplification based on the stimulated emission of electromagnetic radiation. The term “laser” originated as an acronym for “light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation”.
The process is curative and eliminates symptoms including pain and inflammation. The technology uses a combination of light wavelengths and multiple steps to achieve optimal penetration and absorption of the light energy.

LILT is completely safe and unlike most pharmaceutical solutions and other therapeutic options, LILT is non-toxic, non-invasive and in over one million individual treatments, no adverse effects have been reported.

Treatments are usually thirty minutes to a full hour in length, depending on the condition and the size of the area being treated. On your initial visit you will need to fill out paperwork giving personal information as well as past medical history.
The actual treatment will be applied using three steps of two different wavelengths of light and the final step a laser probe is used on local points of pain and inflammation. The majority of patients will not notice any changes with regard to their symptoms until treatment session three or four. There are however exceptions to this rule.
The number of treatments will depend on the chonicity and the extent of the condition involved. Based on the genetic makeup of the cells, and the individual’s response to LILT will vary to some degree.

LILT is the treatment of choice for:

General:

  • Arthritis
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Epicondylitis (Golfer’s or Tennis Elbow)
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Gout
  • Lymphedema
  • Reflex sympathetic dystrophy
  • Repetitive Stress Syndrome and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Rotator Cuff Injuries
  • Temporal-mandibular joint dysfunction (TMJ)

Injury:

  • Contusions
  • Disc Herniation
  • Facet joint syndrome
  • Fractures with associated soft tissue injuries
  • Ligament and tendon tear
  • Neurological Pathologies (peripheral nerve damage)

Inflammatory:

  • Bursitis  – inflammation of a bursa, typically in the knee, elbows, or shoulder
  • Myositis – muscle tissue inflammation and degeneration
  • Plantar fasciitis (jogger’s knee)
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Synovitis
  • Tendonitis

Degenerative:

  • Calcifications (Bone spurs)
  • Chondromalacia patella (CMP) – damaged kneecap cartilage
  • Discogenic and Vertebrogenic radiculopathy
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Spinal stenosis

 

Dermatological Conditions:

  • Acne, including scars
  • Dermal lesions including keloid scars
  • Diabetic foot ulcers
  • Eczema
  • Psoriasis
  • Rosacia
  • Herpes zoster (shingles)